The moral challenge of expatriate employment in developing countries

  • Uchenna Okeja Rhodes University
Keywords: expatriates, multi-national companies, developing countries, business ethics, compensation

Abstract

I aim in this paper to demonstrate the moral problem of expatriate employment in developing countries. To determine how best to construe the moral problem in this context, I first examine four arguments, namely, that in developing countries, expatriate employment is morally wrong because it 1) entrenches the injustice of wage discrimination; 2) produces undesirable outcomes; 3) disregards contextual aspirations and historical memory and 4) is a tool of external domination and control. I analyse these arguments to show that they are insufficient frameworks for understanding the moral impropriety of expatriate employment in developing countries. To this end, I provide an outline of a plausible framework and argue that the moral problem of expatriate employment in this context is unequal or arbitrary distribution of power among employees. The moral wrong in this, I argue, consists in the failure to respect the universal moral equality of people.

Author Biography

Uchenna Okeja, Rhodes University
Senior Lecturer, Department of philosophy, Rhodes University
Published
2017-11-14
How to Cite
Okeja, U. (2017). The moral challenge of expatriate employment in developing countries. Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics, 11(2), 65-77. https://doi.org/10.5324/eip.v11i2.1985
Section
Artikler - Articles