The prevalence of urinary incontinence in elderly Canadians and its association with dementia, ambulatory function, and institutionalization

  • Truls Østbye
  • Michael J. Borrie
  • Steinar Hunskaar

Abstract

 

Study objectives:

 

 

Design and setting:

 

 

Main results:

 

 

Conclusion:

 

 

Key words:

 

 

 

urinary incontinence; dementia; institutionalization; community-institutional relationsUrinary incontinence is a prevalent condition among the elderly, and is associated with

age, dementia, and ambulatory function. Although incontinence is highly prevalent among institutionalized

persons, the majority of persons with incontinence live in the community.

Overall, 16.9% of the women and 8.0% of the men reported incontinence, the numbers

for daily incontinence were 7.0% and 5.2% respectively. The prevalence increased by age, severity of

dementia, and decreasing ambulatory function. It is calculated that 69% of elderly men and 73% of

elderly women with any incontinence live in the community. 31% of the male and 32% of the female

patients have some kind or severity of dementia, and 21% of the men and 27% of the women have

decreased ambulatory function. One half of the persons with incontinence live in the community, with

no cognitive or ambulatory impairment.

Population based multi-centre survey with stratified random sampling all over

Canada. Randomly selected persons aged 65 and over were interviewed. Those having cognitive impairment

(n=1614), a randomly selected sample of those without (n=731) and an institutional sample

(n=1255) underwent clinical assessment.

Data from The Canadian Study of Health and Aging are analysed for prevalence of

urinary incontinence, and its association with dementia, ambulatory function, and institutionalization.

ABSTRACT
Published
2009-10-30
How to Cite
Østbye, T., Borrie, M., & Hunskaar, S. (2009). The prevalence of urinary incontinence in elderly Canadians and its association with dementia, ambulatory function, and institutionalization. Norsk Epidemiologi, 8(2). https://doi.org/10.5324/nje.v8i2.465