Announcement of keynote speaker

Announcement of keynote speaker

For our upcoming conference in November, we are proud to present as one of our keynote speakers Dr. Sarah McCleave of Queen's University, Belfast. McCleave will speak about 18th Century theatrical dance. She has published extensively on Mari Sallé. Her most current book, "Dance in Handel's London Operas", was published by the Univeristy of Rochester Press in 2013.

 

Second keynote speaker confirmed

Second keynote speaker confirmed

We are proud to present our second keynote speaker: David Charlton, Professor Emeritus of Music History, at Royal Holloway, University of London. Charlton has published widely on the history of opera, and especially on opéra-comique. His publications include Opera in the Age of Rousseau: Music, Confrontation, Realism  (2012), French opera, 1730-1830: meaning and media (2000), and Grétry and the growth of opéra-comique (1986).

Announcement of third keynote speaker

Announcement of third keynote speaker

We are happy to announce as our third keynote speaker Susan Maslan, of the French Department at University of California, Berkeley. Professor Maslan works on early modern French literary and political history. Her book Revolutionary Acts: Theater, Democracy, and the French Revolution (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005), is of special interest to our project.

The venue

The venue

The conference will be held at
Suhmhuset
Erling Skakkes gt 47
7012 Trondheim
Norway

Updated weather forecast for Trondheim.

The conference

The conference

Plays, Places and Participants is the second in a series of three conferences arranged by pArts in the period 2012-2015. For more information regarding this conference, as well as on the keynote speakers, please check this site where any changes will be announced.

Regarding Charlton's keynote

Regarding Charlton's keynote

For those interested in reading up on the cultural and sociological background of a story called Annette et Lubin, which forms the subject matter of an opera that our keynote speaker David Charlton will include in his talk Tuesday morning, Charlton's article on this topic is now available here.
The article explains why the opera was performed exclusively on private stages or in private conditions, and that circumstance is of course of interest when we consider the music composed for it – an opéra-comique written for amateur performance.