Communities of peer practitioners. Experiences from an Academic Writing Group

Roger Andre Søraa, Lina Ingeborgrud, Ivana Suboticki, Gisle Solbu

Abstract


Learning academic writing is important for communicating research and participating in scholarly debates. This learning is traditionally conceptualized through a hierarchical teacher-student relation or individual accomplishment. However, in this paper we ask how we might understand the development of academic writing skills as a collective practice within a writing community. We draw on experiences from our own departmental writing group of PhD candidates and highlight our specific peer community as a tool and the draft texts we deliver as boundary objects through which we develop and broaden our academic skills.


Keywords


academic writing; peer writing group; sociomaterial learning; community of practice; PhD writing groups

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/njsts.v5i1.2243

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