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Natursystem der Ungeflügelten Insekten
(Viertes Heft)


Original drawings from the book
by
Joh. Friedr. Wilh. Herbst
1800

The fourth issue of Herbst's Naturesystem der Ungeflügelten Insekten, which was published in 1800, has several beatiful color plates of scorpions. I'm happy to be able to present the scorpion drawings here, with updated species names.

A fulltext version of the whole book is available HERE.

I'm very grateful to the Biology Library at the University of Oslo for getting me a copy of the book!

The electronic version of Herbst's drawings are copyrighted by Jan Ove Rein, The Scorpion Files. No use of or reproduction (electronic or printed) is permitted without permission from the copyrightholder. Legal action will be taken against abuse.

Click on a drawing to get a larger version.

Plate I: Scorpio afer. This species is named Heterometrus indus today.
Plate II: Scorpio longimanus. This species is named Heterometrus longimanus today.
Plate III, Fig. 1: Scorpio italicus. This species is named Euscorpius italicus today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate III.
Plate III, Fig. 2: Scorpio germanicus. This species is named Euscorpius germanus today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate III.
Plate III, Fig. 3: Scorpio tunetanus. This species is named Buthus tunetanus today (previsouly B. occitanus tunetanus). Click here for a large version of the complete plate III.
Plate III, Fig. 4: Scorpio hottentotta. This species is named Hottentotta hottentotta today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate III.
Plate IV, Fig. 1: Scorpio australis. This species is named Androctonus australis today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate IV.
Plate IV, Fig. 2: Scorpio junceus. This species is named Rhopalurus junceus today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate IV.
Plate V, Fig. 1: Scorpio ceilonicus. This species is named Heterometrus indus today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate V.
Plate V, Fig. 2: Scorpio capensis (male). This species is named Opisthacanthus capensis today, but the scorpion on the picture is probably an Opistophthalmus capensis according to Alistair Mathie. The depicted male is probably a female. Click here for a large version of the complete plate V.
Plate V, Fig. 3: Scorpio capensis (female). This species is named Opisthacanthus capensis today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate V.
Plate VI, Fig. 1: Scorpio australasiae. This species is named Liocheles australasiae today. Click here for a large version of the complete plate VI.
Plate VI, Fig. 2: Scorpio dentatus. This species is named Isometrus maculatus today (this is probably a male). Click here for a large version of the complete plate VI.
Plate VI, Fig. 3: Scorpio americanus. The true identity for this scorpion is not known (Incertae sedis). See page 282 in the Catalog of the Scorpions of the world for more details. Click here for a large version of the complete plate VI.
Plate VI, Fig. 4: Scorpio maurus. This species is still named Scorpio maurus, but it is not clear which subspecies this specimen might belong to. Click here for a large version of the complete plate VI.
Plate VII, Fig. 4: Different anatomical drawings (see the book for details).

Jan Ove Rein (C) 2017